STATE KEY FIGURES

nuclear-map1
Enter a caption

nuclear-map2
FOR EACH STATE MENTIONED, THE DIAGRAM SHOWS THE ESTIMATED NUMBER OF; NUCLEAR WEAPONS HELD, AMOUNT OF CONDUCTED TESTS, STOCKPILES, AND STATUS OF NUCLEAR PRODUCTION/POSSESSION

NUCLEAR WEAPON STATES: USA, UK, FRANCE, RUSSIA, CHINA

NON-NPT STATES: INDIA, ISRAEL, PAKISTAN

STATES OF CONCERN: IRAN, NORTH KOREA, SYRIA

Arms Control Association ‘Assessing Progress on Nuclear Nonproliferation and disarmament’ (2016) Accessed: 9th December, 2016. Available at: https://www.armscontrol.org/files/2016_ReportCard_reduced.pdf

Advertisements

Nuclear Nonproliferation efforts in the 21st Century.

2016 has been quite a gut-wrenching year for so many people. From the sheer number of deaths to beloved celebrities, to the 2016 UK ‘EU Referendum’ most commonly known as ‘Brexit,’ and to the recent US Presidential election, in which it’ll be Donald Trump taking reigns of arguably the most powerful nation on this planet. Throughout the year there have been numerous reports of North Korea, and their advancements in Nuclear Power, most specifically in the weapons department. I mean, for such a relatively closed off nation, how advanced is it? We keep seeing reports from various MSM outlets that Kim Jong Un has tested a ‘Hydrogen bomb’ but just how much can we truly believe reports like this? I suppose nations have to take this as solid truth that rogue nations are building up an arsenal of nuclear weapons. Who gives the right to disallow the likes of North Korea, Israel and Pakistan the abilities to develop Nukes, but nations such as the UK, US and Russia allowed to develop them for ‘a deterrence?’ Is it just a matter of racism, on the basis that Westerners are more advanced than those in the East? Or is it simply because the Arsenal size that the US, Russia, France, the UK and China possess could already destroy everything on this planet, twice over, and that the time and money spent on developing these weapons could be used to actually help the earth out. That is essentially the main focus of Nuclear Nonproliferation. To prevent the spread of Nuclear Weapons, and for nations to come together, for the greater good of all life on earth and to make life a brighter place for the future generations.

Continue reading “Nuclear Nonproliferation efforts in the 21st Century.”

Stability vs. instability

Since the mid-1900s, we have witnessed several countries introduce the nuclear bomb to their defence strategy. This is commonly seen as being a dangerous prospect as nuclear war could potentially be the end of the world as we know it today. This therefore suggests that nuclear proliferation causes an air of instability between the world’s superpowers; through the threat that owning a nuclear weapon creates. This “intense standoff between two countries, ‘without direct conflict’ is what is known as the stability-instability paradox“.

Continue reading “Stability vs. instability”

How social/political movements have influenced non-proliferation

The desire for nuclear non-proliferation by people within society has been prevalent since the first detonation of a nuclear weapon in 1945. However, this desire for non-proliferation increased throughout the latter half of the 1940’s and through to the 1950’s. In 1957 the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND) was formed, this organisation advocates unilateral nuclear disarmament, as well as international nuclear disarmament and tighter international arms regulation through agreements such as the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

Continue reading “How social/political movements have influenced non-proliferation”

Humantiarian issues surrounding Nuclear Weapons

 

“One nuclear weapon exploded in one city – be it New York or Moscow, Islamabad or Mumbai, Tokyo or Tel Aviv, Paris or Prague- could kill hundreds of thousands of people. And no matter where it happens, there is no end to what the consequences might be- for our global safety, our security, our society, our economy, to our ultimate survival.” – President Barack Obama

   Continue reading “Humantiarian issues surrounding Nuclear Weapons”

THE ‘ISLAMIC BOMB’

pic-steven-wiesmann
Steve Weissman&Herbert Krosney ‘The Islamic Bomb’ Published, 1981

The ‘Islamic bomb’ was introduced in the 1970’s and is perceived to be the desire for Pan-Islamic nuclear capability amongst Muslim countries. It is understood to be through the notions of religious ties, that the ‘Islamic bomb’ would be acquired.

Zulfikar Ali Bhutto (Pakistani prime minister 1971-77) once said, ‘There was a Christian bomb, a Jewish bomb, and now a Hindu bomb. Why not an Islamic bomb?’ A statement as such certainly would raise concern particularly in Washington- Was Samuel Huntington correct in arguing that the fundamental problem for the West was Islam?  

Continue reading “THE ‘ISLAMIC BOMB’”